Joe K. Gerald MD, PhD

Joe K. Gerald MD, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Community, Environment & Policy
Major Area of Interest: 
Public Health, tuberculosis, asthma, hygiene strategies in elementary schools, health outcomes and asthma screening, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and completion of a clinician-directed, internet-delivered education program targeting the care of post-MI patients with multiple co-morbidities
Biography: 

As a health services researcher with expertise in cost-effectiveness analysis, he is well-suited to evaluate the economic impact of health interventions. He has previously conducted economic analyses of pulmonary interventions including tuberculosis contact investigation strategies, school-based asthma screening strategies and hand hygiene strategies in elementary schools. His particular expertise is using short-cycle (daily) Markov modeling to estimate the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) of various health interventions. This short-cycle approach is well-suited to model chronic conditions such as asthma that are associated with frequent, debilitating symptoms followed by periods of relatively good health. He has successfully used community-based, standard-gamble derived daily preference weights to conduct a reference case cost-effectiveness analysis of school-based asthma screening. This work was recently published in the Journal of Asthma and Clinical Immunology (Gerald 2010) and was recently recognized by the Physician Section of the American School Health Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics Council on School Health as one of the most important school health papers published in 2010.

He also has expertise in health outcomes and comparative effectiveness research. He completed a T32 post-doctoral fellowship in health services and outcome research. He has published several manuscripts examining health outcomes and asthma screening, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and completion of a clinician-directed, internet-delivered education program targeting the care of post-MI patients with multiple co-morbidities. His current work is examining adherence to asthma medications in children and parent-child differences on the Pediatric Asthma Health Outcome Measure (PAHOM). The PAHOM is an instrument that allows researchers to prospectively capture quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) among children with asthma.